Fallacy: a deceptive, misleading, or false notion, belief, etc.; any of various types of erroneous reasoning that render arguments logically unsound.

It seems as if many of us that live on top of this majestic, rotating mud-ball tend to live through fallacies. Plenty of us take on beliefs that are theoretically sound and, at the same time, realistically silly. Others believe in things that aren’t worth wiping one’s backside with.

Melissa Ortiz brings up a lot of interesting talking points about Black women and their ability to be “highly argumentative”. We all know that we have seen the Black woman that can’t keep herself out of some sort of conflict. We know too well the Black girl that easily has to have a problem with anyone and anything. You know the type: loud, obnoxious, and always ready to ruin a tranquil moment with their train-wreck disposition fueled by chicken-headed foolishness smothered in thot-sauce (not hot sauce, boss; thot-sauce). So, there is some validity to what she is saying.

Yet, Melissa threw plenty of that same validity out of the window when she tried to paint a vivid picture with broad brush strokes. Broad strokes are only good for painting big surfaces. Situations and issues with Black women have to be much more detailed. More Dali-like skill and less Home Depot.

While this video did cause some discussion and concern on my Facebook wall (surprisingly and unsurprisingly), this video bothered many women. Once I looked at it for myself, I am actually bothered by it myself.

1.)    I question who is overrun by hoodrat-slut culture:

I’m just asking because, as a whole, Black women are supposed to be a bunch of hoodrat sluts. The problem is that the video takes on a keep-it-real vibe but doesn’t actually keep it real. Dissecting a subset of a social class/cultural group does not make it worthwhile to actually work to acknowledge the issues of the whole. In short, all Black women are not taking on the actions and mentality of sluts. If you think so, then you are insulting all Black women.

2.)    Using statistics without understanding the true context they exist in only invite problems:

50% of Black women have herpes according to the CDC. Well, that is what they say. But how many women were actually tested? 5? 500,000? No, it was only 5,000 women tested [2]. Oh, and those women were tested for exposure to the HSV-2 virus. This isn’t the same as developing herpes; having the virus and developing the disease are two different things [3]. But whatever.

Unless all women are tested, I don’t want to get into those type of statistics.

Another problematic stat she spoke up on is the “75 percent bastard baby rate”. Yeah, that rate is misleading in its own right. The problem is that the birth rate for married AND unmarried Black women is dropping [4]. It just so happen that those said children are “bastard babies”.

Oh, and “bastard baby” deals with marriage, not parental involvement.

3.)    Melissa Ortiz obviously needs to be around better people:

Her main example had to deal with her family. So, there is a big chance that a lot of the drama that she is witnessing has to do with the people that she is around. If you feel that life only offers a certain type of situation, then there are two possibilities:  that is all that life has to offer or that is all YOUR circumstances have to offer. Plus, family drama can be the worst examples because plenty of families have drama.

4.)    Black women do not monopolize the “loud-rude-argumentative” realm of the world:

I have seen plenty of PEOPLE of different races become loud, rude, and argumentative. Having those characteristics have nothing to do with color. Sometimes, we need to stop associating characteristics with color and associate them with character period. Or, just associate them with behavior.

5.)    She would have done better with fewer insults that are grounded on unsavory opinion:

a statement like “wandering through life aimlessly- no direction, no legacy, no wealth, no decent maternal figure to teach then decorum or how to be sexually responsible…” would work if it was entirely true. Again, she wants to paint people broadly and it doesn’t work. I know plenty of women with direction, legacy, GREAT maternal figures, and are quite sexually responsible. I even know some wealthy ones as well.

I respect the fact that she put her opinion out there. However, I cannot give her just due for the validity and true worth of what she said. She tried to take the issues of the few and make them the problems of the whole. This is the problem when we include the issues of “some” to be for “everybody”. In the end, we end up talking about nobody.

‘Nuff Said and ‘Nuff Respect!!!

 

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